Issue 3/2018 of integration

In the new issue of integration, Peter Becker covers the negoti­ation process of the next multi­annual financial framework 2021–2027 and under­lines the necessity of finding a reliable balance between budgetary predictability on the one hand and political adapt­ability on the other. Jonas Bornemann discusses the member states’ sovereign choice to reintroduce border controls and the legal framework estab­lished by the Schengen acquis, which aims at the abolition of such checks. Antonios Souris analyses the federal states’ voting behaviour in the plenary sessions of the Bundesrat regarding European affairs and concludes that partisan consid­er­a­tions of federal states’ govern­ments in European affairs are almost as strongly pronounced as in similar decision-making proce­dures related to domestic legis­lation. Anne Wetzel addresses the issue of rule imple­men­tation and compliance in models of external differ­en­tiated integration based on the example of the Energy Community. The issue contains also a summary of a conference on the relations between the EU and the Ukraine, organized by the Institut für Europäische Politik. The “Arbeit­skreis Europäische Integration” reports on the “2018 ZEW Public Finance Conference” about the future of fiscal coordi­nation in Europe.


The EU’s next Multiannual Budget between Flexibility and Unity

Peter Becker

With the proposal for the next multi­annual financial framework (MFF) 2021–2027 of 2 May 2018, the European Commission opened a difficult negoti­ation process that is crucial for the future of the European Union. In addition to the contro­versy over the volume and allocation of funds, another issue of the MFF negoti­a­tions will be important for the further devel­opment of the EU. A reliable balance needs to be found between budgetary predictability on the one hand and political adapt­ability on the other. The objective of improving the EU’s capacity for response through flexi­bility instru­ments inside and outside the MFF will have to be brought into line with the budgetary principles of budget unity and completeness. The European Parliament’s budgetary partic­i­pation and scrutiny rights and thus the democ­ratic legit­imacy of the EU budget as a whole must be taken into account properly.

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Member State Discretion within the Schengen Borders Code – Bearings for an Area with Border Control Abolished

Jonas Bornemann

Following the so-called refugee crisis, several Schengen states opted for the reintro­duction of border controls. The mere fact that such checks were not just appro­priate but equally lawful was beyond doubt when the new German federal government took office. Notably, however, the European Parliament agrees. It argues that continuous prolon­gation of such checks would amount to the abolition of the Schengen area altogether. How do these divergent concep­tions come about? Which margins of discretion do member states possess in order to reintroduce border controls in line with European Union law? With a view to the evolution of the Schengen regime, this contri­bution explores the tensions between member states’ sovereign choice to reintroduce border controls and the legal framework estab­lished by the Schengen acquis, which aims at the abolition of such checks.


Party Contestation over Europe in the Committees of the German Bundesrat

Antonios Souris

The party politi­ci­sation of European integration in the German Bundesrat remains largely in the dark due to the missing documen­tation of the federal states’ voting behaviour in the plenary sessions. For an empir­i­cally informed analysis, this contri­bution draws on a novel dataset that focuses on the Bundesrat committees where individual votes are regis­tered. The findings reveal that there have been profound partisan consid­er­a­tions of federal states’ govern­ments in European affairs since the early 1990s, being almost as strongly pronounced as in similar decision-making proce­dures related to domestic legis­lation.


Flexible Integration and Compliance – Lessons from the Energy Community

Anne Wetzel

This article addresses the issue of rule imple­men­tation and compliance in models of external differ­en­tiated integration. Since rules and their proper imple­men­tation are the basis of the European Union’s flexible integration arrange­ments, any viable model must ensure compliance even by non-EU members. However, the Energy Community as a means of exter­nal­i­sation of EU law does not fully meet this expec­tation. In order to trace the origins of the Energy Community’s compliance problems the analysis reverts to four different approaches. The article identifies several insti­tu­tional weaknesses of the Energy Community and offers conclu­sions for flexible integration and inten­sified partnership models.


TAGUNGEN

Matthias Meier und Ljudmyla Melnyk

Poten­ziale für eine vertiefte Zusam­me­narbeit zwischen der Europäischen Union und der Ukraine


ARBEITSKREIS EUROPÄISCHE INTEGRATION

Sebastian Blesse

Erken­nt­nisse zur Gestaltung gemein­samer Fiskalpolitik in Europa


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Preise 2018: Jahresabon­nement Privat (Print­ausgabe inkl. Onlinezugang) 78,– €; Jahresabon­nement für Studierende (Print­ausgabe inkl. Onlinezugang) 44,– € (bitte Studi­enbescheinigung zusenden); Jahresabon­nement für Insti­tu­tionen (Print­ausgabe inkl. Onlinezugang) 124,– €; Einzelheft 22,– €. Alle Preise verstehen sich inkl. MwSt. zzgl. Vertrieb­skosten (Vertrieb­skos­tenanteil 10,81 €, plus Direk­t­be­orderungs­gebühr Inland 1,61 € p.a.).

ISSN 0720–5120

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